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This is Not a Cheesesteak

Send me your cheesesteak knock-offs from 'round the globe and other Philly/cheesesteak-related meanderings: thisisnotacheesesteak@gmail.com

Include your name, a photo from a menu or the actual offensive sandwich, where you found the travesty (city, state, country) and a brief description/opinions of it.

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Posts tagged recipes

Oct 28 '11
"How to Cook a Screaming Eagle" by Sam Sifton
In honor of the National Editor of the New York Times, that tweeted about this blog one week ago, I’m posting this recipe that he adapted from Michael Kann, associate director, Boston College Dining, Chestnut Hill, MA.
In this college-geared article, he acknowledges that this sandwich is distinctly not a cheesesteak.

A Penn student would not recognize the Screaming Eagle as a cheese steak. A Drexel, Curtis or Temple kid would scoff. The sandwich is nothing like what you’d get at Pat’s or Geno’s, napped in Cheez Whiz and wrapped in waxed paper.

Anyhow, if you’re reading this, thanks for the mention on Twitter, Sam. I’m glad you have an appreciation for proper cheesesteaks. (I noticed you were breaking that up into two words. Could you put in a good word with the AP or something so we can officially make it one word?)

"How to Cook a Screaming Eagle" by Sam Sifton

In honor of the National Editor of the New York Times, that tweeted about this blog one week ago, I’m posting this recipe that he adapted from Michael Kann, associate director, Boston College Dining, Chestnut Hill, MA.

In this college-geared article, he acknowledges that this sandwich is distinctly not a cheesesteak.

A Penn student would not recognize the Screaming Eagle as a cheese steak. A Drexel, Curtis or Temple kid would scoff. The sandwich is nothing like what you’d get at Pat’s or Geno’s, napped in Cheez Whiz and wrapped in waxed paper.

Anyhow, if you’re reading this, thanks for the mention on Twitter, Sam. I’m glad you have an appreciation for proper cheesesteaks. (I noticed you were breaking that up into two words. Could you put in a good word with the AP or something so we can officially make it one word?)

Oct 21 '11

What the hell? You took a recipe for a cheesesteak and turned into a steak quesadilla. Now, I’ve seen it all. I’m sorry, use real cheese if you’re going to bastardize whiz by using mayo/sour cream/and Asiago. Wow.

quasiazzurro:

No cheese whiz (unavailable) vs using 50% mayo/50% sour cream (on top of Asiago cheese) instead, and of course a piadina instead of the bread. Finger licking good (it’s a mess, you kinda have to).

from

http://thegrubhub.tumblr.com/post/10894086243/cheese-steaks-or-gtfo-ive-lived-right-outside

Oct 18 '11
Red onions? Green AND red peppers?
White (or perhaps yellow) onions, sauteed or raw are the only onions acceptable on cheesesteaks. Red onions have a taste that’s too potent. If anything, chop ‘em up. Ugh. And what kind of bread is that?! Sourdough!? Talk about potent tastes. AHHHH
fantasticedibles:

Philly Cheesesteak with Onions and Peppers
Recipe

Red onions? Green AND red peppers?

White (or perhaps yellow) onions, sauteed or raw are the only onions acceptable on cheesesteaks. Red onions have a taste that’s too potent. If anything, chop ‘em up. Ugh. And what kind of bread is that?! Sourdough!? Talk about potent tastes. AHHHH

fantasticedibles:

Philly Cheesesteak with Onions and Peppers

Recipe

Oct 14 '11
Oct 13 '11
Looks more like a brisket sandwich. At least you’re disassociating it with Philadelphia.
Some feedback: All your ingredients are acceptable. Well, maybe not the garlic powder but I’ll let it slide… because I love garlic. Those cuts of steak are WAY TOO THICK though, like 10x too thick. Also, without opening the door to the “hoagie vs. hero vs. sub vs. etc” argument. We call ‘em Italian rolls, hoagie rolls or simply long rolls.
naomiheartsfood:

MONDAY’S MEAL
Brooklyn Cheese Steaks :) - Lol … I only called it that because they’re different from the ones found in Philly!
All you need is:
- Fresh hero bread (sliced in half)
- Thin-sliced beef or steaks (sometimes supermarkets don’t have thin pre-sliced steaks, but something called “beef shoulder”; tastes the same as steak)
- White onions
- Provolone slices (from your local deli)
- Salt, black pepper, powdered garlic
- Mayo (optional)
Then, sauté the onions in a pan with a LITTLE bit of oil until they’re a light brown color. Put the onions aside, and place a slice of the beef in the pan. 
*Depending on how your beef is packaged, you won’t have to do any prep work on it before putting it in the pan, except for sprinkling the various seasonings onto the beef beforehand.*
The beef won’t take long to cook. Cook it on one side for about five minutes, then flip it and cook it on the other side for another 3-4 minutes. While the beef is finishing up, spread a little (or A LOT) of mayo onto the bread. Put slices of cheese & some onions onto the hero bread. 
Split the slice of beef in half (so it’ll fit in the bread the long way - see picture), and place on the bread. Cut in half & ENJOY!

Looks more like a brisket sandwich. At least you’re disassociating it with Philadelphia.

Some feedback: All your ingredients are acceptable. Well, maybe not the garlic powder but I’ll let it slide… because I love garlic. Those cuts of steak are WAY TOO THICK though, like 10x too thick. Also, without opening the door to the “hoagie vs. hero vs. sub vs. etc” argument. We call ‘em Italian rolls, hoagie rolls or simply long rolls.

naomiheartsfood:

MONDAY’S MEAL

Brooklyn Cheese Steaks :) - Lol … I only called it that because they’re different from the ones found in Philly!

All you need is:

- Fresh hero bread (sliced in half)

- Thin-sliced beef or steaks (sometimes supermarkets don’t have thin pre-sliced steaks, but something called “beef shoulder”; tastes the same as steak)

- White onions

- Provolone slices (from your local deli)

- Salt, black pepper, powdered garlic

- Mayo (optional)

Then, sauté the onions in a pan with a LITTLE bit of oil until they’re a light brown color. Put the onions aside, and place a slice of the beef in the pan. 

*Depending on how your beef is packaged, you won’t have to do any prep work on it before putting it in the pan, except for sprinkling the various seasonings onto the beef beforehand.*

The beef won’t take long to cook. Cook it on one side for about five minutes, then flip it and cook it on the other side for another 3-4 minutes. While the beef is finishing up, spread a little (or A LOT) of mayo onto the bread. Put slices of cheese & some onions onto the hero bread.

Split the slice of beef in half (so it’ll fit in the bread the long way - see picture), and place on the bread. Cut in half & ENJOY!